Made for play, children’s toys are rife with potential hidden hazards ranging from sharp edges to cords or small parts, to name a few. The humble plaything can cause great harm if not designed and manufactured correctly. A new version of ISO’s most well-known toy safety standard has just been published to ensure it keeps safety up to scratch in our ever-changing world.

ISO 8124-1, Safety of toys – Part 1: Safety aspects related to mechanical and physical properties, defines requirements and test methods for toys intended for use by children under 14 years of age, and covers a reasonable lifespan of the toy. It specifies acceptable criteria for structural characteristics of toys, such as shape, size and contour, as well as aspects particular to certain toys such as tip angles for ride-on toys. It also includes appropriate warnings and instructions for use.

Christian Wetterberg, Chair of the technical committee that develops the series, said the 150-page standard covers a wide range of potential risks, such as sharp points, small parts and maximum kinetic energy values for projectiles, and has a strong impact around the world.

“ISO 8124 already plays an important role in influencing the requirements for toy safety in many countries, so it is important that it remains as up to date and relevant as possible,” he said.

“The latest version includes updated definitions and warning requirements, revised specifications related to a range of materials and parts, such as cords and straps, and the addition of new items such as yo-yo balls.”

ISO 8124-1 is one of ISO’s longest and most detailed standards. Other standards in the series include Part 2 on flammability and Part 4 for swings, slides and similar activity toys.

ISO 8124 was developed by ISO/TC 181, Safety of toys, whose secretariat is held by DS, ISO’s member for Denmark. The series is available for purchase from your national ISO member or through the ISO Store.